Friday, June 4, 2010

Broken

PHOTOGRAPHER'S JOURNAL - This was the first abandoned farmstead I found when I got to Peter's Valley last month. It's a short distance from the craft center where we all stayed, and I found it on my first drive up the road after I arrived.

It is often the details that speak most clearly to me. The suggestion of modern, overhead, garage doors usually make a barn unsuitable for photographs, and so I questioned my own attraction to this one. I didn't bother photographing it that first morning, but when I returned the next day the clouds were perfect. Unfortunately, another photographer with a medium format camera was set up in front of it for a long shoot. He had no interest in the clouds and was set up ten or fifteen feet in front and just left of the barn door. I struggled to find angles to cut him out or that placed him so that I could delete him in Photoshop, but such compromises rarely work. I knew where I wanted to stand. Fortunately 30 minutes later when the photographer moved, the clouds were still good, and finally I was able to stand exactly where my instincts told me to. Others may find the battered barn door incongruous. For me, it is the voice in conversation with the sky. I wonder what the other photographer got.

5 comments:

Trotter said...

Hi Ted! Thirty minutes well worth the wait... ;)

Blogtrotter Two is departing Turkey 2009! Enjoy the views and have a great week ahead!!

Mel Chern said...

One of my most recent favorite photos of yours. The clouds really make it for me.... I'm not sure I'd like it without the drama...

Ted Roth said...

Quickly checking in while traveling - Trotter, I'll visit your site when I'm back home.

Glad you liked this one, Mel. I don't think I would have taken it without the extra drama of the clouds. It all seemed to fit, but that's what I always aim for. Thanks for the comment.

Andrée said...

I always wonder why we are drawn to old barns. They are comforting in a way, somehow. Thisis such a wonderful photo.

Ted Roth said...

Hi Andrée. I guess I like old barns because they are on the bleeding edge of time. These old barns were hand crafted to serve a way of life that has vanished or is vanishing. For me they connect us to the past.

I'm just back from Maine and ready to explore what's new on your site. Thanks for stopping by.