Saturday, April 11, 2015

The Farrel Sand Elevator



PHOTOGRAPHER’S JOURNAL: Even before I wanted to know what it was, I imagined what it might be like up in those tin can offices with their rickety terraces and dangling stairs, and what treasures had been left moldering deep in the bowels of the beast? It is as much a relic of industry as of railroading and an archetype for model railroad enthusiasts to miniaturize. Some of the track remains in place that threaded the rail yard to carry trains through the opening under the elevator and into the long shed that stretched to the end of the property.

I didn’t know then that the bridge and tower dated at least to the start of World War I, nor had I yet discovered what was still up in the long passageway or how deeply it penetrated the rows of Farrel, work sheds to deliver sand from train cars to molds used by the foundry to make giant rubber and sugar calenders for which Farrel-Birmingham became famous. 

What does Connecticut want to remember from what’s left of Ansonia’s industrial heritage? What does future Connecticut need to know about those who came before? Should any part of this place be salvaged to help tell its story or provoke a question? 

I’m only a photographer, and my photographs are not meant to answer those questions, only to show the things that caught the camera-eye of one of time’s vagrants looking for shelter along the track. 








2 comments:

Trotter said...

Hi Ted!
Amazing shots, as always. Holiday in Portugal - 41 years of democracy and 45 years I met my wife. Champagne is already in the fridge. Cheers...
Enjoy a short stopover in London at Blogtrotter
Wish you a great weekend!

Emery Roth II said...

Great shots of London, Gil, especially that sunburst on the Thames and your series on St. Paul's dome. Undergraduate, my studies were in architecture. St. Paul's is a wonderful building. What a passage to go from Westminster to St. Paul's!